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Historic Buildings



Ballyscullion Park, Derry

CONTACT:   Rosalind Mulholland ADDRESS:  Bellaghy Co. Derry
PHONE:  0044 28 79 386 235 FAX: 
EMAIL:   info@ballyscullionpark.com  WEB:  www.ballyscullionpark.com

 

Ballyscullion Park is a beautiful historic house designed in 1840 by Sir Charles Lanyon in the Palazzo style.
The house is set in rolling parkland with breathtaking views over Lough Beg to Church Island and the Antrim hills.
Situated in the centre of Northern Ireland, 35 minutes from Belfast and 45 minutes from Derry/Londonderry, and half an hour from Coleraine and Cookstown, this central location makes it an ideal venue for weddings and parties.

History
Ballyscullion Park is situated on the shores of Lough Beg, through which the River Bann flows. It is a Ramsa site, and Site of Special Scientific Interest owing to the richness and diversity of flora and birdlife. At the southern end of the strand, surrounded by the Lough on one side and wetlands on the other, is the ancient historic monument, Church Island.

The original site of Ballyscullion Park was chosen in the late Eighteenth Century by Augustus Hervey, The Earl Bishop of Derry for his second palace in the county. The first, which is now in ruins, he built at Downhill on the north coast. The building of Ballyscullion began in 1789, to the Earl Bishops own extravagant designs. The fašade was 350ft across, with a central rotunda flanked by curved wings with a large pavilion at each end. A double corkscrew staircase led from the entrance hall to the second storey circular drawing room which had panoramic views across to the Antrim hills in the east, the Mourne Mountains to the south and the Sperrin Mountains to the west. The present house was designed by Sir Charles Lanyon, and built in 1840 for Sir Henry Hervey Bruce
 


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